Current Events Photo via PlanetSave

Published on May 27th, 2014 | by Robyn Purchia

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Will Ohio Politicians Protect the People or the Koch Bros?

Most people think renewable energy is a good thing. It spurs development, creates jobs, promotes democracy, and reduces harmful air emissions. But despite these many benefits, states have considered repealing their renewable energy standards. In fact, just a few weeks ago, EdenKeeper reported on the narrow defeat of a proposal to roll back the Kansas renewable energy standard. And now, as reported by Planetsave, the Ohio House plans to vote on a bill that will “gut” the state’s renewable energy standards.

This is not a conservative versus liberal issue. There are no tea-partiers or religious-right fanatics calling for the end of renewable energy development. Instead, just the opposite is true. In Kansas and Ohio, religious organizations have fought back and urged politicians to consider their moral responsibilities to protect creation and the people of their states. And the tea party has actually formed a coalition with Sierra Club to promote a free market and consumer choice in the energy sector.

If the Ohio House approves the bill, they won’t be champions for the conservative cause or heroes for the people. Instead, they will be playing into the Koch brothers’ pockets at the expense of the people who actually voted for them.

Check out the article below, and tell us what you think.

Ohio Utilities Fight Renewable Energy, Ohio Religious Leaders Fight Back (via Planetsave)

In an example of just how wrong stereotypes can be, the recent move by the Ohio State Senate to freeze the state’s renewable standard, along with its energy efficiency program, at 2014 levels for the next two years, is being strongly opposed by a…

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About the Author

I'm an organic-eating, energy-saving naturalist who composts and tree hugs in her spare time. I have a background in environmental law, lobbying, and field work. I believe in God; however, I do not call myself a Christian or a Jew or a member of any religion. I am merely someone who finds a spiritual connection to all humans and the environment. You can find me on Twitter, Facebook, and .



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